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CONTENTS

GENERAL INFORMATION
ACADEMIC UNITS
COURSES
PERSONNEL
REFERENCE

GENERAL INFORMATION

Message From the President 2
The University of Hawai'i 5
Calendar 6-7
Undergraduate Education 8-
22
UHM General Education Core and Graduation Requirements 23-
27
Graduate Education 28-
45
Student Life 46-
58
Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid 59-
69
Degrees and Certificates 70-
71

ACADEMIC UNITS

Architecture 72-
76
Arts & Sciences, AMST-IT 77-
122
Arts & Sciences, JOUR-ZOOL 122-
175
Business Administration 176-
185
Education
186-
207
Engineering 208-
216
Hawaiian, Asian, and Pacific Studies 217-
225
Health Sciences and Social Welfare 226
Interdisciplinary Programs 227-
233
Law 234-
236
Medicine 237-
255
Nursing 256-
266
Ocean and Earth Science and Technology 267-
284
Outreach College 285-
288
Public Health 289-
292
ROTC Programs 293-
294
Social Work
295-
297
Travel Industry Management 298-
303
Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources 304-
324
Instructional Support, Research, and Service Units  478-
483

COURSES

Overview 325
A - E 326-
379
F - N 379-
427
O - Z 427-
477

PERSONNEL

Administration 484-
485
Endowed Chairs and Distinguished Professorships 486
Faculty 486-
510
Emeriti Faculty 511-
517
Instructional Support, Research, and Service Units Staff 518-
527

REFERENCE

Appendix 528-
532
Glossary 533-
535
Campus Map

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Last updated 6/28/99

 

 

School of Travel Industry Management
Academic Policies

Good Academic Standing

Undergraduate TIM students must meet the following requirements to maintain good academic standing:

1. Cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 for all courses attempted at UH Manoa for a grade. Transfer credits and courses completed under the CR/NC option are not included.

2. A GPA of at least 2.0 in the upper division TIM core and TIM emphasis plus the TIM/TRNS electives. However, a cumulative GPA of 2.5 for the TIM emphasis and TIM/TRNS elective courses is required for graduation.

3. Satisfactory progress toward completion of degree requirements. This means students must enroll in courses required for the degree and complete these courses with acceptable grades.

Probation

A student who fails to meet any one of the academic standing requirements at the end of any semester is placed on probation. Probationary students must achieve a current (semester) GPA of at least 2.0 to be allowed continued registration. Grades of I (incomplete) and W (withdrawal) are not permitted during probation. Failure to correct academic deficiencies may lead to suspension and eventual dismissal from the University.

Withdrawal from Courses

As the semester progresses, it becomes increasingly difficult to withdraw from a course. No withdrawals are permitted after the ninth day of class except for unusual or extenuating circumstances beyond the control of the student.

Advancement to Upper Division Courses

Students are expected to complete the TIM lower division special requirements (see the "School Requirements" section on the following page) before enrolling in upper division TIM courses.

Undergraduate Program

Areas of Emphasis

TIM offers four areas of emphasis within the BS program: hotel management, restaurant/institutional food service management, tourism management, and transportation management. The undergraduate instructional program is committed to the development of competent management personnel for the travel industry through a curriculum that enables students to develop leadership abilities to solve problems of a dynamic industry.

The global nature of the curriculum provides insight into the role and responsibilities of the industry within state, regional, national, and world perspectives, as well as the nature of service-based enterprises, business ethics, and societal constraints. In addition, practical knowledge regarding operational aspects of the industry enables students to develop "reality skills" within the field.

Hotel Management 

The hotel management emphasis is intended to provide students with the ability to apply problem-solving and decision-making techniques and critical-thinking skills to meet current and future industry challenges. Students will study the relationship of the various constituencies (customer, owner, staff) in the management and operation of hotels, inns, and resorts; the microeconomics of the lodging industry in its various forms; and investment risks associated with tangible properties.

In addition, students will study basic financial control procedures that are specific to hotel operations; factors affecting design, planning, construction, physical operation, and profitability; and basic principles of marketing hotels and resorts with a focus on public relations, pricing and yield management, and advertising.

Restaurant/Institutional Food Service Management

The restaurant/institutional food service management emphasis provides the background necessary for those interested in the management of food service establishments. Students will learn the systems approaches to food service management, managerial techniques, financial management, purchasing, planning, decision-making, menu development, personnel management, and cost control.

The basics of conceiving, designing, marketing, and operating a commercial food-service facility either as a free-standing operation or as a part of a hotel, club, entertainment and recreation complex, or institution are covered, along with principles of basic and quantity food production. Key concepts relating to quality assurance principles and sensory evaluation techniques as they apply to food service are also studied.

Tourism Management

This emphasis focuses on strategic issues related to the travel industry, as well as marketing and management principles within specific types of businesses, including travel agencies, tour operations, visitor attractions, and others. Students learn to analyze macroeconomic factors related to the development of tourism and identify impacts of tourism on society and the environment.

Additionally, students will learn tourism research techniques and the formulation of tourism policy within the context of both private and public tourism and travel institutions.

Transportation Management

Students choosing the transportation emphasis will gain an understanding of the characteristics and importance of transportation systems for the United States (both domestic and international); the major transportation modes; government, promotional and regulatory activities in U.S. transportation; the role of transportation in tourism; the transportation systems that impact the economics of both Hawai'i and the United States; and the management of firms in various transportation modes.

Within various sectors of the travel industry, students analyze issues confronting airlines and airports that relate to management, government regulation and promotion, new techniques, distribution, and industry trends. Tourist-related and urban transportation systems, surface passenger transportation systems, and international air and marine transportation are also covered. Major logistical activities are also analyzed (traffic management, warehousing, inventory control, order processing, packaging, and materials management).


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