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Human Nutrition, Food, and Animal Sciences

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Human Nutrition, Food, and Animal Sciences

Agricultural Sciences 216
1955 East-West Rd.
Honolulu, HI 96822
Tel: (808) 956-7095
Fax: (808) 956-4024
E-mail: hnfas@ctahr.hawaii.edu
Web: www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/hnfas/

Faculty

*Graduate Faculty

*H. M. Zaleski, PhD (Chair)—swine production and management, reproductive physiology
*M. A. Dunn, PhD (Graduate Chair)—nutritional biochemistry, vitamins and minerals
*A. C. Brown, PhD, RD—medical nutrition therapy, complementary medicine, herbs
*B. A. Buckley, PhD—beef production and breeding
*J. R. Carpenter, PhD—ruminant nutrition and metabolism, forage evaluation, and ruminant production
L. Y. T. Ching, BS—livestock extension education (Kaua‘i Cooperative Extension Service)
*J. Dobbs, PhD—food composition, nutrition, domestic animals, avian and wildlife nutrition
*D. A. Dooley, PhD—diet and behavior, nutrition education, ethics of food choice
M. W. DuPonte, MS—livestock extension education (Hawai‘i Cooperative Extension Service)
G. K. Fukumoto, MS—livestock extension education (Hawai‘i Cooperative Extension Service)
*C.Y. Hu, PhD—animal growth, adipose differentiation, lipid metabolism
*A. S. Huang, PhD—food chemistry, taro processing
*W. T. Iwaoka, PhD—food chemistry, food safety, food science education
* S. Jun, PhD—food engineering, biosensors and processing control
N. A. Kanehiro, MS, RD—human nutrition extension education (O‘ahu Cooperative Extension Service)
*Y. S. Kim, PhD—meat science, muscle biology, animal growth, biotechnology
*C. N. Lee, PhD— dairy production and reproductive management
*Y. Li, PhD—food microbiology, food safety and probiotics
*S. R. Malecha, PhD—aquaculture production and breeding
*S. T. Nakamoto, MBA, PhD—marketing of perishable products, agricultural economics
L. C. Nakamura-Tengan, MS—consumer food safety, extension education and resource management (Maui Cooperative Extension Service)
*R. Novotny, PhD, RD—community and international nutrition, nutritional epidemiology, body composition
J. S. Powley, MS—livestock extension education (Maui Cooperative Extension Service)
*A. C. Shovic, PhD, RD—dietetics
*M. S. Thorne, PhD—range production and ecology (Hawai‘i Cooperative Extension Service)
*C. A. Titchenal, PhD—nutrition and human performance, dietary supplements, nutrition journalism
*D. L. Vincent, PhD—reproductive physiology and endocrinology
*C. W. Weems, PhD—molecular endocrinology and reproduction
*Y. S. Weems, PhD—reproductive endocrinology
*J. Yang, PhD—molecular biology and animal biotechnology
*S. Zaghloul, PhD—community nutrition
J. M. Zee, MPH, RD—human nutrition extension education (Hawai‘i Cooperative Extension Service)

Cooperating Graduate Faculty in Animal Sciences

*E. G. Grau, PhD—fish endocrinology
*T. Hirano, PhD—hormonal control of fish osmoregulation, growth and development
*B. W. Mathews, PhD—agronomy and soil sciences, and plant growth/physiology

Affiliate Faculty in Animal Sciences

*B. Argue, PhD—aquacultural genetics
*S. Atkinson, PhD—endocrinology and reproduction of marine mammals
*O. Decamp, PhD—aquaculture microbiology
*I. Forster, PhD—aquaculture feeds and nutrition
C. Laidley, PhD—aquaculture reproductive endocrinology
B. Okimoto, DVM—exotic animal husbandry and diseases
L. C. Rawson, DVM—animal diseases, health and welfare
*A. Tacon, PhD—aquaculture feeds and nutrition
*L. A. Woodward, PhD—fish, wildlife management and conservation biology
T. M. Work, DVM—fish and wildlife, health and conservation biology

Cooperating Graduate Faculty in Food Sciences

*H. Ako, PhD—nutritional biochemistry, aquaculture, lipid metabolism
*D. Borthakur, PhD—microbiology, biotechnology
*R. S. Fujioka, PhD—water resources, food microbiology
*L. Gautz, PhD—instrumental quality evaluation
*Q. Li, PhD—analytical methodology to identify environmental toxins
*P. Q. Patek, PhD—microbiology
*R. Paull, PhD—fresh fruit and vegetable physiology and handling
*A. S. Saulo, PhD—food technology extension, food safety and quality
*J. Seifert, PhD—toxicology
*W. W. Su, PhD—bioprocess engineering
*C. S. Tamaru, PhD—live feed, aquaculture

Affiliate Graduate Faculty in Food Sciences

*A. Tacon, PhD—aquaculture feeds and nutrition

Cooperating Graduate Faculty in Nutritional Sciences

*M. J. Berry, PhD—selenoproteins, antioxidants and human diseases
*J. J. Buzanoski, MD, MPH—geriatric medicine
*A. Franke, PhD—analytical chemistry, phytochemicals
*J. Grove, PhD—biostatistics
*R. Hetzler, PhD—exercise physiology, sports nutrition
*D. Jenkins, PhD—bioengineering
*D. A. Lally, PhD—exercise physiology
*L. Le Marchand, MD, MPH, PhD—nutritional epidemiology, genetic markers
*G. Maskarinec, MD, MPH, PhD—nutritional epidemiology, soy, hormones and cancer
*S. Murphy, RD, PhD—diet assessment, community nutrition
*P. V. Nerurkar, PhD—medical biochemistry
*C. R. Nigg, PhD—exercise behavior
*S. Sharma, PhD—nutritional epidemiology
*A. G. Theriault, PhD—clinical biochemistry, lipid metabolism in heart disease and diabetes
*C. Waslien, PhD, RD—ethnicity and diet, geriatrics

Affiliate Graduate Faculty in Nutritional Sciences

*D. Galanis, PhD—Pacific island nutrition, nutritional epidemiology
*J. Gittelsohn, PhD—nutritional anthropology, nutrition intervention, international nutrition
*W. D. B. Hiller, MD—sports nutrition
*A. Tacon, PhD—aquaculture in human nutrition
*T. Vogt, MD—dietary intervention trials

Degrees Offered: BS in animal sciences, BS in food science and human nutrition, MS in animal sciences, MS in food science, MS in nutritional sciences

The Academic Program

The HNFAS department has undergraduate programs in Animal Sciences (ANSC) and Food Science and Human Nutrition (FSHN) and a graduate program in Human Nutrition, Food, and Animal Sciences offering MS degrees in Animal Sciences, Nutritional Sciences and Food Science. The MS programs are described under Graduate Study.

Animal science is the application of experimental investigation, cutting edge technology, and other scientific principles for the advancement of efficient and environmentally friendly animal agriculture and improved food quality and safety. Students receive training in both basic and applied agricultural systems, as well as in animal sciences. The animal science program focuses on pre-veterinary training with emphasis on swine, sheep, beef and dairy cattle, and pond aquaculture production and management systems. Students are also exposed to the challenges of proper care/welfare and management of pets and companion animals (including horses), marine mammals, exotic wildlife and/or zoo animals. Unlike most continental U.S. institutions, the emphasis of the present program is on tropical production systems with particular reference to the Pacific Basin or other subtropical regions. Animal scientists have careers in management and production, veterinary medicine, food processing and marketing, animal biotechnology, zoo and wildlife management, the pharmaceutical and feed industries, teaching, extension education and research. Those positions require skills in disciplines such as nutrition, genetics, physiology, environmental and waste management, meat science and growth biology, animal health, feed and forage/browse utilization, engineering, business management/marketing and salesmanship. Other skills of critical importance are computer proficiency, written and oral communication, problem solving, and ability to build effective interpersonal relationships.

The undergraduate curricula in food science and human nutrition (FSHN) have a strong science base that is applied to food and human nutrition. Options in the curricula include dietetics, human nutrition, and science education. Interest in nutrition, food, and the relationship of food to human health and fitness has never been greater than today. Students majoring in any of the curricula options are prepared for diverse careers in the food industry, health-care and fitness facilities, hospitals, nutrition education and communication enterprises, government or private-sector food and nutrition agencies, science related research laboratories, and science education. Students learn problem-solving skills, approaches to critical thinking and basic principles in two related disciplines. The dietetic option has been approved by the American Dietetic Association. The human nutrition option can be directed toward nutrition education, sports nutrition, or other interests. The human nutrition option can serve as a pre-professional program in medicine, dentistry, nutrition, or other scientific graduate programs. The science education option provides students with a curriculum that fulfills the academic requirements for a Chemistry, Biology, or General Science certification as a secondary school science teacher. To complete certification requirements, a student can apply for the College of Education Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in the Secondary Education Program.

Students are strongly encouraged to take chemistry and biological sciences courses prior to entering the program. Transfer students in FSHN are required to have a GPA of 2.8 or greater and to have taken FSHN 185 with a “B” (not B-) or better and CHEM 161/161L with a “C” (not C-) or better.

Upon entering either program, Animal Sciences (ANSC) or Food Science and Human Nutrition (FSHN), students will be assisted by academic advisors to identify their career objectives and select an appropriate option for study.

Advising

All FSHN and ANSC majors are required to report for advising prior to registration each semester.

Undergraduate Study

BS in Animal Sciences/Pre-Vet

Requirements

  • Course work in the basic sciences, mathematics, economics, and animal sciences including the following:
    • NREM 220 or ECON 131
    • CHEM 161/161L, 162/162L, and 272/272L
    • MBBE 402/402L
    • MATH 140 or above
    • PHYS 151/151L
    • One of BIOL 171, MICRO 130, SCI 124, or ZOOL 101
  • Animal sciences required courses:
    • ANSC 200, 201, 244, 301, 321, and 445
    • Three of the following: ANSC 451, 453, 454/454L, 462, and 472
    • One of the following production courses: ANSC 431, 432, 433, and 450
  • Additional electives to make a total of 128 credit hours

Because of the diversity among fields of specialization within animal sciences, specific course requirements will vary considerably among students. On the recommendation of the student’s major advisor, courses will be selected from those offered in animal sciences, as well as in natural resources and environmental management, bioengineering, anatomy and reproductive biology, biochemistry and biophysics, chemistry, environmental biochemistry, food science and human nutrition, genetics, tropical plant and soil sciences, information and computer sciences, microbiology, oceanography, physiology, and zoology.

Veterinary Science

Students interested in becoming veterinarians generally major in Animal Sciences, within the Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences, and participate in CTAHR’s pre-veterinary curriculum. A BS degree is desirable but not required for veterinary schools. The CTAHR pre-veterinary advisor assists students in meeting the admission requirements of veterinary schools that participate in the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) program, including the University of California—Davis, Colorado State University, and the Washington, Oregon, Idaho College of Veterinary Medicine at Washington State University. Hawai‘i students are also encouraged to make applications to other continental U.S. veterinary schools that accept nonresident students. Students should contact the website of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges for information about the Veterinary Medical College Application Service at www.aavmc.org/vmcas/vmcas.htm and for more information about specific requirements for admission to veterinary schools. The department also sponsors the Pre-Veterinary Club of Hawai‘i, which offers students opportunity to interact with other students interested in veterinary medicine and working with animals. Students seeking additional information and advising should contact the Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences (Agricultural Sciences Building, 1955 East-West Road, Room 216, Honolulu, Hawai‘i 96822 (808) 956-7095).

BS in Food Science and Human Nutrition

Dietetics

Students choosing a professional career as a Registered Dietitian (RD) and who desire to do nutrition counseling should select the academic course work outlined in this option. This option meets the undergraduate academic requirements established by the American Dietetic Association (ADA), to become a Registered Dietitian. Upon receiving a Bachelor of Science degree, students must be accepted into an accredited internship or an approved pre-professional practice program (AP-4). Upon successful completion of a 6-11 month internship, or AP-4, the student is eligible to take the national dietetic registration examination administered by the Commission on Dietetic Registration. Students generally need to have a GPA of 3.0 or above to be competitive for internship programs. Students may contact Dr. Anne Shovic ((808) 956-3847, e-mail: shovic@hawaii.edu), the Dietetics Program Director, and are encouraged to refer to the Dietetics Option Student Handbook for more information about this option (www.hawaii.edu/dietetics). Work and/or volunteer experience in the field of interest is highly recommended.

Human Nutrition

Pre-professional Option

This course of study allows students to prepare for post-baccalaureate study in nutrition and nutrition-related disciplines. With guidance from their advisor, students can design a course of study to prepare them for post-baccalaureate studies in health professional programs (medicine, dental, pharmacy, etc.), or a graduate degree in nutrition or other biomedical science. This course of study does not meet all of the undergraduate academic requirements of the American Dietetic Association to apply for a dietetic internship.

Sports and Wellness

Students in the Human Nutrition option, who are interested in pursuing a career in sports and wellness, are encouraged to complete course work in applied musculo-skeletal anatomy, exercise physiology (KLS 353, 354, and 354L), and nutrition in exercise and sport (FSHN 480). These recommended courses can be added to the Dietetics program option if the student desires to do professional nutritional counseling or be taken as electives in the Human Nutrition option if the student intends to pursue graduate studies.

Science Education: Secondary Science Teacher Certification

The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) offers many science certifications to high school teachers. Based on departmental requirements, interested students may also fulfill the academic requirements for a Chemistry, Biology or General Science certification. To complete the remaining educational requirements for NSTA certification after graduation with a BS degree in FSHN, a student can apply for the College of Education’s Post-Baccalaureate Certification in Secondary Education Program (PBCSE). The PBCSE is a certification program for the preparation of secondary school teachers, consisting of six interrelated courses totaling 28 credits. These credits may be taken in a full-time 10-month program. Students interested in this option should contact Dr. Dooley ((808) 956-7021, e-mail: dian@hawaii.edu).

Requirements

A total of at least 128 credits are required for graduation. Students seeking additional information and advising should contact the Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences (Agricultural Sciences Building, 1955 East-West Road, Room 216, Honolulu, HI 96822; (808) 956-7095, e-mail: hnfas@ctahr.hawaii.edu).

Graduate Study

The department offers a MS program in Human Nutrition, Food, and Animal Sciences. Students can choose from three MS degree options within the program: Animal Sciences, Nutritional Sciences, or Food Science. The programs offer both Plan A (thesis) and Plan B (non thesis) options. Admission and degree requirements are listed below, but are subject to change. For current information, contact the Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences (Agricultural Sciences Building, 1955 East-West Road, Room 216, Honolulu, HI 96822; (808) 956-7095, e-mail: hnfas@ctahr.hawaii.edu).

MS in Animal Sciences

The MS in animal sciences is offered in both the basic and applied areas of genetics, nutrition, physiology, animal diseases, molecular biology of growth and metabolism, and animal muscle biology.

Specialty areas consist of beef-cattle nutrition, grazing management, and genetics; dairy-cattle nutrition and physiology (especially the management of cattle in a hot climate); swine management; reproductive physiology and endocrinology of sheep, cattle, fish and swine; molecular biology of animal growth and metabolism; muscle biology and meat science; health and disease; nutrient/waste management; and freshwater shrimp breeding, nutrition, and pond management systems. Emphasis is placed on the application of scientific methods for both the development and improvement of animal industries in subtropical and tropical environments. There is also the opportunity for cooperative studies in the areas of care/welfare and management of pets and companion animals (including horses), marine mammals, exotic wildlife and/or zoo animals. Candidates wishing to specialize in animal breeding and genetics should be particularly strong in mathematics, including statistics, with a good biological background.

Admission Requirements

To be considered for admission to the animal sciences program, an applicant must (1) hold a bachelor’s degree with a major in animal science (or the equivalent thereof) from an accredited institution of higher learning with a GPA of 3.0, (2) provide evidence of superior scholarship in previous academic work, (3) arrange for three letters of recommendation, (4) submit GRE general test scores, (5) submit an application including a statement of objectives, (6) submit a resume, and (7) submit a TOEFL score of 580 minimum, 600 recommended (250 computer) if a foreign student. Interviews by phone or in person in Hawai‘i may be requested by the admissions committee. An applicant with a bachelor’s degree in a major other than animal or veterinary sciences who otherwise qualifies for admission will be required to take ANSC 200 or 201, one production course, and such other undergraduate courses deemed necessary by the department as essential background to the applicant’s studies. The ANSC 200 or 201 requirements may be satisfied through meeting the teaching experience requirement.

The deadlines for receipt of all application materials are February 1 for fall applicants, and September 1 for spring semester applicants.

Degree Requirements

Plan A (Thesis)

Students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours, including:

  • At least 18 credits of course work at the graduate level, 12 of which must be at the 600 level or above (excluding 699 and 700) including two credits of ANSC 641 (seminar) and FSHN 601;
  • a maximum of 2 credits of directed research (ANSC 699); and
  • 10 credits of Thesis Research (ANSC 700).

Plan B (Non-thesis)

Students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours, including:

  • At least 18 credits in course work numbered 600 and above (excluding 699), including two credits of ANSC 641 and FSHN 601.
  • 4 credits of directed research (ANSC 699).
  • Remaining credits must be at the graduate level.

Both Plan A and B

A general exam on basic knowledge in the animal sciences is required of all students to advance to candidacy for the MS degree. A final exam based on the student’s Plan A Thesis Research, or Plan B directed research is also required. Students are required to attend weekly seminars each semester and present a minimum of three formal seminars during their graduate training (including their thesis defense). A maximum of 2 credits is allowed for graduate seminar (ANSC 641). The following courses are recommended as a core for most graduate students in animal sciences: ANSC 642, 643, 644, 652, 687 and a graduate-level statistics course.

Each student will be required to serve as a Teaching Assistant (TA), in either a paid or non-paid status, for a minimum of one course for one semester. This experience must include leading laboratory or discussion sections, and evaluation by the instructor.

In both plans (on the recommendation of the student’s graduate committee), the graduate credit hours will be selected from the graduate courses offered in animal sciences or other related disciplines such as anatomy and reproductive biology, biochemistry, chemistry, genetics, microbiology, physiology, public health, zoology. Because of the diversity of specializations within animal sciences, specific course requirements will vary considerably among students. Further information is available at www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/hnfas/Academic/grad_as_menu.htm.

MS in Nutritional Sciences

The MS in nutritional sciences prepares students to understand the scientific basis of nutrition, its application to health and fitness, and the skills needed to conduct basic and applied nutrition research. Subject areas of concentration include obesity, bioactive food components, diet and cancer, mineral nutrition and toxicology, sports nutrition, nutrition education, nutritional product development, community and international nutrition, nutritional biochemistry, and nutritional epidemiology. Cooperating programs include Public Health, Kinesiology and Leisure Science, Food Science, Animal Science, Physiology, the School of Medicine, and the Cancer Research Center of Hawai‘i.

Depending on the area of focus, students are prepared for diverse careers in nutrition and food-related industries, government agencies, and academic institutions. Graduates have found employment as college instructors; nutrition educators or consultants in the private sector; nutritionists in the food industry, fitness facilities, or health-related government agencies; and as research scientists in the health-care industry, private sector, government, or academic research institutions. Many have pursued PhD and other professional degrees at major universities around the country.

Admission Requirements

Academic prerequisites include a bachelor’s degree in nutrition or a closely related field, a minimum grade point average of 3.0, and undergraduate course work in nutrition, human physiology, biochemistry, and statistics. Motivated students without a nutrition related degree may apply, but will be expected to make up undergraduate course deficiencies if admitted to the program. Students are strongly encouraged to take introductory science courses prior to applying to the program. Additional requirements include submission of GRE General Test scores (no minimum score required), two confidential recommendations (using our program’s recommendation forms), a TOEFL score of 580 minimum, 600 recommended (250 computer) if a foreign student; a personal resume; and a completed Graduate Admissions Application including statement of objectives. Interviews by phone or in person if in Hawai‘i may be requested by the admissions committee. The deadlines for receipt of all application materials are February 1 for fall semester applicants, and September 1 for spring applicants.

Degree Requirements

Two MS degree options are available: Plan A (thesis) and Plan B (non-thesis). Generally, students are expected to follow Plan A unless the Plan B option is approved by the Graduate Chairperson and the student’s advisor.

Plan A (Thesis)

Students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours, including:

  • 18 credit hours of coursework at the graduate level, 12 of which must be at the 600 level (excluding 699 and 700);
  • 2 credits of Directed Reading and Research (699); and
  • 10 credits of thesis research (700).

Plan B (Non-thesis)

Students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours, including:

  • at least 18 credit hours of coursework at the 600 level or above (excluding 699) and
  • 6-9 credits of Directed Reading and Research (699)
  • Remaining credits are fulfilled by graduate level electives that are selected in consultation with the graduate advisor.

Both Plan A and B

All students are required to pass an oral exam of basic nutrition knowledge to advance to candidacy for the MS degree, and a final exam based on the Thesis Research (Plan A) or Directed Reading and Research (Plan B). Students are required to attend weekly seminars each semester and present a minimum of two seminars for credit during their graduate program. The following courses are required as a core for most graduate students in Nutritional Sciences: FSHN 601, 631, 681, 682, 685 and a graduate-level statistics course. Each student will be required to serve as a Teaching Assistant (TA), in either a paid or non-paid status, for a minimum of one course for one semester. This experience must include a significant instructional component and evaluation by the instructor.

In both plans (in consultation with the student’s graduate committee), the graduate credit hours will be selected from the graduate courses offered in nutritional sciences as well as other related disciplines such as food science, cell and molecular biology, epidemiology, genetics, physiology, public health, kinesiology and statistics. Because of the diversity of specializations within nutritional sciences, specific course requirements will vary among students. Further information is available at www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/hnfas/Academic/grad_ns_menu.htm.

MS in Food Science

The MS in food science offers areas of concentration in food safety and quality, food processing and engineering, food chemistry and biochemistry, food biotechnology, and product development. Graduates have found employment as college instructors, technical personnel in the food industry, regulatory or other governmental agencies, and researchers. Others have pursued further postgraduate studies.

Admission requirements

Academic prerequisites include a bachelor’s degree in food science or a closely related field, a minimum grade point average of 3.0, and undergraduate course work in introductory foods, biochemistry, introductory nutrition, and statistics. Motivated students without a food science-related degree may apply, but will be expected to make up undergraduate deficiencies if admitted. Students are strongly encouraged to take chemistry and introductory food courses prior to applying to the program.

Additional requirements include: submission of GRE General Test scores (no minimum score required); two confidential recommendations (using our program’s recommendation forms); a TOEFL score of 580 minimum, 600 recommended (250 computer) if a foreign student; a personal resume; and a completed Graduate Admissions Application including statement of objectives. Interviews by phone or in person if in Hawai‘i may be requested by the admissions committee. The deadlines for receipt of all application materials are February 1 for fall semester applicants, and September 1 for spring applicants.

Degree Requirements

Plan A (Thesis)

Students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours, including:

  • At least 18 credit hours of course work, 12 of which must be at the 600 level or above (excluding 699 and 700)
  • 2 credits of Directed Research (699)
  • 10 credits of thesis research (700)

Plan B (Non-thesis)

Students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours, including:

  • at least 18 credit hours of course work at the 600 level or above (excluding 699); and
  • 6 to 9 credits of Directed Reading and Research (699);
  • Remaining credits are fulfilled by graduate level electives that are selected in consultation with the graduate advisor.

Both Plan A and B

All students are required to pass an oral exam of basic knowledge in food science to advance to candidacy for the MS degree, and a final exam based on the Thesis Research (Plan A) or Directed Reading and Research (Plan B). Students are required to attend weekly seminars (FSHN 681) each semester and present a minimum of two seminars for credit during their graduate program. The following courses are required as a core for graduate students in Food Science: FSHN 601, 607, 608, 681, 701 and a graduate-level statistics course. Each student will be required to serve as a Teaching Assistant (TA), in either a paid or non-paid status, for a minimum of one course for one semester. This experience must include a significant instructional component and evaluation by the instructor.

In both plans (in consultation with the student’s graduate advisor), the graduate credit hours will be selected from graduate courses offered in Food Science as well as other related disciplines such as biochemistry, nutrition, microbiology, genetics, biotechnology, cell and molecular biology, and statistics. Because of the diversity of specializations within food science, specific course requirements will vary among students. Further information is available at www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/hnfas/Academic/grad_fs_menu.htm.

Honors and Awards

The department has several teaching assistantships, research assistantships, and scholarships that are awarded to deserving qualified students.

FSHN Courses