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Curriculum Studies

Everly Hall 224
1776 University Avenue
Honolulu, HI 96822
Tel: (808) 956-4401
Fax: (808) 956-9905
Web: www.hawaii.edu/coe/departments/edcs

Faculty

*N. A. Pateman, EdD (Chair)—mathematics education
*A. Bartlett, PhD—literacy education, children area of faculty expertise literature
E. Bettencourt, MEd—Hawaiian language immersion education, teacher education
K. Cashman, MEd—indigenous teacher education, art education, storytelling
*V. Chattergy, EdD—multicultural education, elementary education
*P. Chinn, EdD—elementary and secondary science education, culture and science studies
*P. Deering, PhD—social studies, middle school curriculum
*S. Feeney, PhD—early childhood education
*A. R. Freese, PhD—qualitative research, multicultural education
*P. Halagao, PhD—social studies, multicultural education, Filipino curriculum and pedagogy
*J. Kaomea, PhD—indigenous education, qualitative research, elementary mathematics
*E. B. Klemm, EdD—elementary and secondary science education, marine science and environmental curriculum
G. (Kalehua) Krug, MEd—Hawaiian language immersion education, teacher education
P. Kukea Shultz, MEd—indigenous teacher education and curriculum development
M. Lenchanko, MEdT—indigenous education and curriculum development
*M. Maaka, PhD—indigenous education, language and cognition, research methodologies
*H. Slaughter, EdD—language arts, literacy, qualitative research, reading
*B. L. Williams, PhD—art education

Cooperating Graduate Faculty

A. Bayer, PhD—reading, composition, collaborative learning
R. S. Black, EdD—mental retardation transition, students at risk, research design
D. H. Davidson, PhD—child development, early childhood education
A. J. Dawson, PhD—mathematics education
B. D. DeBaryshe, PhD—educational measurement, early childhood
D. Grace, EdD—language, literacy, media studies, early childhood
D. P. Ericson, PhD—philosophy of education, educational policy
J. Herring, EdD—art education
R. K. Hetzler, PhD—exercise physiology with interest in body composition and metabolism
K. Hijirida, EdD—Japanese teaching methodology, curriculum theory and development, language teaching for special purposes
R. Johnson, EdD—elementary and early childhood education
A. J. Kawakami, PhD—educational psychology
C. Kessler, PhD—social studies education
I. F. Kimura, PhD—kinesiology, athletic training and biomechanics
I. King, PhD—mathematics education, supervision
V. W. Krohn-Ching, MFA—art education
B. Landau, PhD—education law, equity in education, and democratic classroom management
M. I. Martini, PhD—parenting and family relationships across cultures
H. McEwan, PhD—curriculum theory, philosophy of teaching
J. Moniz, PhD—multicultural education
N. Murata, PhD—general physical education, pedagogy, adapted physical education, special education/transition, and professional development
R. Nowak, PhD—elementary language, literacy
M. E. Pateman, HSD-MPH—health education
J. H. Prins, PhD—kinesiology
S. B. Roberts, EdD—curriculum administration, policy, professional socialization, school administration
A. Serna, PhD—school health education
J. Skouge, EdD—exceptionalities
T. W. Speitel, PhD—science curriculum research and development, computer communications
R. A. Stodden, PhD—mental retardation, career/vocational special education
M. Taylor, PhD—middle level and secondary language education
F. C. Walton, PhD—career, technology and technical education
D. B. Young, EdD—science education
J. Zilliox, EdD—mathematics education

Degrees Offered: MEd in curriculum studies, MEd in early childhood education, PhD in curriculum and instruction

The Academic Program

The Department of Curriculum Studies (EDCS) offers advanced degrees at the masters level in curriculum studies and early childhood education (MEd), and, as part of a college-wide doctoral degree, in curriculum and instruction (PhD).

MEd students have the option of taking courses that lead to middle school endorsement. All programs focus on the educational needs of children and adolescents, teaching, learning and curriculum.

The students at UH Manoa are ethnically diverse as are the students in Hawai‘i’s school system. Students in EDCS programs, therefore, learn and teach in a unique multicultural environment.

Graduate Study

General information, policies, requirements and procedures of the Graduate Division are in the Graduate Information Bulletin (available at and may be ordered from the Campus Center Bookstore, 2465 Campus Road, Honolulu, HI 96822). Students interested in graduate study should read it carefully.

Master of Education in Curriculum Studies

The Department of Curriculum Studies offers a 30 credit program leading to the degree of master of education in curriculum studies. It is designed to serve licensed teachers who wish to learn about and inquire into the areas of preschool/primary, elementary, middle level or secondary education. The program equips teachers to fill a variety of teaching and resource roles at an advanced level. Students may attend part-time but the program must be completed within seven years of the date of admission.

The MEd program in curriculum studies helps teachers become better informed about the developmental and educational needs of children and adolescents from various types of communities; skillful in diagnostic and evaluation procedures and in developing educational programs to meet individual and group needs; versatile in their employment of teaching strategies; capable of providing leadership in a classroom, school, or school system; knowledgeable about issues, trends, and research in their fields; systematic in their reflective assessment of trends and innovations, and well-informed about new technology and its applications.

Admission Requirements

In addition to the requirements of the Graduate Division, applicants for the MEd in the curriculum studies program must provide the following:

  1. Evidence of successful academic performance in curriculum, psychological and societal foundations, and appropriate methods courses;
  2. Evidence of successful academic performance in an academic minor (applicants pursing elementary education specializations) or in an academic major (applicants pursuing secondary education specializations);
  3. Evidence of full-time teaching experience or its equivalent, and
  4. Three (3) professional references from people who are able to comment on the quality of the applicant’s experience, ability to pursue graduate study, and character.

Program Requirements

Students are advanced to candidacy only after the development of their program plan and the successful completion of 12 credit hours of approved courses.

Additional details about the program are available in the Information Bulletin available from the Department of Curriculum Studies.

Plan A (Thesis) Requirements

The Plan A program is designed primarily for students interested in research and in writing a thesis. It requires a minimum of 30 credit hours of course work with at least 12 credit hours in curriculum studies. Of the 30 credit hours, 24 credit hours (excluding 699s and 700) must be approved course work. Required courses are the appropriate sections of EDCS 622 and EDCS 667, and two research methods courses. A minimum of 18 credit hours is to be taken in a related field. Usually this field will be the same as the student’s undergraduate major (or minor), but it may be in some other area of specialization within the Department of Curriculum Studies, in other departments in the College of Education, or in a discipline in one or more of the other colleges at the UH. Of the approved courses, 12 credit hours (exclusive of research methods courses) must be at the 600 to 700 level. Six credit hours (EDCS 700) are required for the thesis.

Plan B (Non-thesis) Requirements

The Plan B program is designed primarily for students who wish to strengthen their teaching field major or minor or to pursue course work in selected areas of teacher education and curriculum studies. It requires a minimum of 30 credit hours of approved course work, with a minimum of 12 credit hours in curriculum studies (excluding EDCS 699). Required courses are an appropriate section of EDCS 622 and EDCS 667, and two research methods courses. A minimum of 18 credit hours is to be taken in a related field. The related field is usually the same as the student’s undergraduate academic major (or minor), or it may be in some other area of specialization within the Department of Curriculum Studies, in other departments in the College of Education, or in a discipline in one or more of the other colleges at the UH. Of the approved courses, 18 credit hours must be at the 600 to 700 level, excluding 699. A maximum of 6 credit hours of 699 may be applied to the degree program.

The Plan B program also requires a culminating paper.

For further information and application forms contact the secretary of the Department of Curriculum Studies, Everly Hall 224, telephone (808) 956-4401.

Master of Education in Early Childhood Education

The Department of Curriculum Studies in the College of Education in cooperation with the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR) offers a 30 credit program leading to the degree of Master of Education in Early Childhood Education. The program is designed to support professional development and promote leadership in personnel who work in programs with children between infancy and five-years of age.

The program is designed to help students learn about the developmental and educational needs of young children and about working with families; to become more skillful in developing educational programs to meet the needs of all children including those with disabilities; to gain awareness of current issues, trends and research in early education and assessment; to become more reflective in their professional practice, and to become capable of providing ethical leadership in an early childhood classroom or agency.

Admission Requirements

In addition to the requirements of the Graduate Division, applicants for the MEd in Early Childhood Education must provide the following:

  1. Evidence of successful academic performance in child development and early childhood education;
  2. Documented experience of work with young children and their families, or in early childhood program administration or public policy;
  3. Three (3) professional references from people who are able to comment on the quality of the applicant’s experience, ability to pursue graduate study, and character.

Program Requirements

Thirty (30) credit hours in early childhood regular education, early childhood special education, and child development are required. Students will take a common core and select a concentration in teaching or in program administration, policy, and advocacy.

A required core of 18 credits will be taken by all students. Core courses will be offered by the Departments of Curriculum Studies (EDCS) and Special Education (SPED) in the COE and Family Resources (FAMR) in CTAHR. Another 12 credits of elective courses will be selected in consultation with the program advisor based on the student’s area of concentration, interests, and professional needs. Elective courses may be chosen from a number of departments in the College of Education and other units in the UH.

Plan A (Thesis) Requirements

The Plan A program is designed for those who are interested in research and writing a thesis and who may be interested in pursuing a later doctoral degree. Students in Plan A will take a minimum of 30 credit hours including 18 at the 600 level or higher, a core consisting of 18 credits, six credits of electives, and 6 credits of thesis research (EDCS 700). The culminating experience for Plan A students will be a thesis based on original research.

Plan B (Non-Thesis) Requirements

The Plan B program is for those who wish to focus on strengthening professional knowledge and skills. Students in Plan B will take a minimum of 30 credit hours including 18 credits at the 600 level or higher, a core consisting of 18 credits, 9 credits of electives and 3 credits of directed reading. The culminating experience for Plan B students will be the submission of a portfolio that documents that they have met program standards. The program advisor will guide and direct the development of the portfolio.

For further information and application forms contact the secretary of the Department of Curriculum Studies, Everly Hall 224, telephone (808) 956-4401.

Doctoral Degree

The doctor of philosophy in education (PhD) is a college-wide degree awarded for distinguished academic preparation for professional practice in the field of education.

The goal of the PhD with a specialization in curriculum and instruction is to develop specialists in curriculum development, teaching, and curriculum evaluation. The number of credit hours for the program of study varies, depending upon the candidate’s qualifications, and includes a college component required for all doctoral students enrolled in the College of Education; an area of specialization with course work leading to a specialty in curriculum development, teaching and learning, or curriculum and program evaluation; a cognate field with course work taken outside the Department of Curriculum Studies; a field project or an internship; and the dissertation.

For additional information, see the “Doctoral Degrees” section within the College of Education section of this Catalog.

EDCS Courses