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Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences

Agricultural Sciences 216
1955 East-West Road
Honolulu, HI 96822
Tel: (808) 956-7095
Fax: (808) 956-4024
Email: hnfas@ctahr.hawaii.edu
Web: www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/hnfas/

Faculty

*Graduate Faculty

*D. L. Vincent, PhD (Chair)—reproductive physiology and endocrinology
*M. A. Dunn, PhD (Graduate Chair, Nutritional Sciences MS and Nutrition PhD programs)—nutritional biochemistry, vitamins and minerals
*J. Banna, PhD, RD—community nutrition, nutrition education in minority populations
*B. A. Buckley, PhD—beef production and breeding
*J. Dobbs, PhD—food composition, nutrition, domestic animals, avian and wildlife nutrition
M. W. DuPonte, MS—livestock extension education (Hawai'i Cooperative Extension Service)
G. K. Fukumoto, MS—livestock extension education (Hawai'i Cooperative Extension Service)
*C.Y. Hu, PhD—animal growth, adipose differentiation, lipid metabolism
*A. S. Huang, PhD—food chemistry, taro processing
*W. T. Iwaoka, PhD—food chemistry, food safety, food science education
*R. Jha, PhD—feed evaluation and animal nutrition
*S. Jun, PhD—food engineering, biosensors and processing control
N. A. Kanehiro, MS, RD—human nutrition extension education (O'ahu Cooperative Extension Service)
*Y. S. Kim, PhD—meat science, muscle biology, animal growth, biotechnology
*C. N. Lee, PhD— dairy production management and reproductive physiology
*Y. Li, PhD (Graduate Chair, Food Science)—food microbiology, food safety and probiotics
*S. R. Malecha, PhD—aquaculture production and breeding
*S. T. Nakamoto, MBA, PhD—marketing of perishable products, agricultural economics
L. C. Nakamura-Tengan, MS—consumer food safety, extension education and resource management (Maui Cooperative Extension Service)
*R. Novotny, PhD, RD—community and international nutrition, nutritional epidemiology, body composition
*T. B. Ron, PhD—aquaculture extension and training
M. A. Segobiano, MS, CEC, CCE, CHE—chef instructor
*A. C. Shovic, PhD, RD—dietetics
M. H. Stevenson, MS—livestock extension education (Kaua'i Cooperative Extension Services)
*M. L. Stewart, PhD—nutrition, dietary fiber, gut health
*A. M. Stokes, DVM, PhD—veterinary medicine, cardiovascular physiology
*M. S. Thorne, PhD—range production and ecology (Hawai'i Cooperative Extension Service)
*C. A. Titchenal, PhD—nutrition and human performance, dietary supplements, nutrition journalism
*C. A. Watters, MSC, RD, PhD—clinical and community nutrition-evidence based practices
*J. Yang, PhD (Graduate Chair, Animal Sciences)—molecular biology and animal biotechnology
*H. M. Zaleski, PhD—swine production and management, reproductive physiology
J. M. Zee, MPH, RD—human nutrition extension education (Hawai'i Cooperative Extension Service)

Cooperating Graduate Faculty in Animal Sciences

E. G. Grau, PhD—fish endocrinology
B. W. Mathews, PhD—aquaculture and nutrition

Affiliate Faculty in Animal Sciences

*S. Atkinson, PhD—marine mammals
*I. Forster, PhD—aquaculture feeds and nutrition
C. Laidley, PhD—aquaculture reproductive endocrinology
K. R. Longnecker, PhD—invertebrate taxonomy and dietary analysis of Hawaiian monk seals
S. Moss, PhD—shrimp aquaculture
*B. Okimoto, DVM—exotic animal husbandry and diseases
A. Ostrewski, PhD—aquaculture
L. Polasek, PhD—marine mammal biology, wildlife and fisheries sciences
L. C. Rawson, DVM—animal diseases, health and welfare
M. Snover, PhD—reptile, wildlife management and conservation biology
K. L. West, PhD—marine mammal science and biology
L. A. Woodward, PhD—fish, wildlife management and conservation biology
T. M. Work, DVM—fish and wildlife, health and conservation biology

Cooperating Graduate Faculty in Food Sciences

*H. Ako, PhD—nutritional biochemistry, aquaculture, lipid metabolism
*D. Borthakur, PhD—microbiology, biotechnology
*L. Gautz, PhD—instrumental quality evaluation
*Q. Li, PhD—analytical methodology to identify environmental toxins
*P. Q. Patek, PhD—microbiology
*R. Paull, PhD—fresh fruit and vegetable physiology and handling
*A. S. Saulo, PhD—food technology extension, food safety and quality
*W. W. Su, PhD—bioprocess engineering
*C. S. Tamaru, PhD—live feed, aquaculture

Cooperating Graduate Faculty in Nutritional Sciences

*M. J. Berry, PhD—selenoproteins, antioxidants and human diseases
C. J. Boushey, PhD—nutritional epidemiology, obesity and cancer
H. B. Davis, PhD—nutritional biochemistry, mitochrondrial functions
*A. Franke, PhD—analytical chemistry, phytochemicals
*R. Hetzler, PhD—exercise physiology, sports nutrition
*D. Jenkins, PhD—bioengineering
*L. Le Marchand, MD, MPH, PhD—nutritional epidemiology, genetic markers
*G. Maskarinec, MD, MPH, PhD—nutritional epidemiology, soy, hormones and cancer
*S. Murphy, RD, PhD—diet assessment, community nutrition
*P. V. Nerurkar, PhD—medical biochemistry
*C. R. Nigg, PhD—exercise behavior

Affiliate Graduate Faculty in Nutritional Sciences

J. Gittelsohn, PhD—nutritional anthropology, nutritional intervention
R. Leon-Guerrero, PhD—obesity and chronic disease prevention, diet assessment

Cooperating Graduate Faculty in Nutrition PhD Program

C. L. Albright, PhD—intervention research on energy balance; weight control; physical activity; dietary fat, fiber, and fruits/vegetables
M. J. Berry, PhD—selenoproteins; antioxidants and human disease
C. J. Boushey, PhD—nutritional epidemiology, obesity and cancer
R. Cooney, PhD—tocopherols, carotenoids and coenzyme Q-10 mechanisms of action in health and disease
A. Franke, PhD—analytical chemistry, lab assessments, phytochemicals
R. Hetzler, PhD—exercise physiology, sports nutrition
L. N. Kolonel, MD, PhD—nutrition and cancer, cancer epidemiology
J. D. Latner, PhD—clinical psychology, eating behaviors and disorders, obesity
L. LeMarchand, MD, MPH, PhD—nutritional epidemiology, genetic markers
Q. X. Li, PhD—environmental biochemistry, proteomics
G. Maskarinec, MD, MPH, PhD—nutritional epidemiology, soy, hormones and cancer
S. Murphy, RD, PhD—diet assessment, community nutrition
P. Nerurkar, PhD—metabolic disorders and alternative medicine
C. R. Nigg, PhD—theory of health behavior change, intervention, physical activity/exercise and nutrition behavior, research design

Affiliate Graduate Faculty in Nutrition PhD Program

J. Gittelsohn, PhD—nutritional anthropology, nutritional intervention
H. Turner, PhD—cell biology and immunology
T. Vogt, MD, MPH—dietary intervention trials

Degrees Offered: BS in animal sciences, BS in food science and human nutrition, MS in animal sciences, MS in food science, MS in nutritional sciences, PhD in nutrition

The Academic Program

The Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences (HNFAS) offers both undergraduate and graduate programs leading to BS, MS, and PhD degrees. Two BS degrees are available: animal sciences (ANSC) and food science and human nutrition (FSHN). The pre-veterinary medicine program is located in the department to provide advising for students seeking to attend veterinary professional training after college. Three MS degrees are offered: animal sciences, nutritional sciences, and food science. The department is also the home locus for the inter-college PhD program in nutrition. The MS and PhD programs are described under graduate study.

Animal science is the application of experimental investigation, cutting edge technology, and other scientific principles for the advancement of efficient and environmentally friendly animal agriculture and improved food quality and safety. Students receive training in both basic and applied agricultural systems, as well as in animal sciences. One focus of the animal science program is on pre-veterinary training but the program also emphasizes preparation for work in production and management systems for the major farm animals such as swine, sheep and goats, beef and dairy cattle, and aquatic/aquaculture animals. Students are also exposed to the challenges of proper care/welfare and management of pets and companion animals (including horses), marine mammals, exotic wildlife and/or zoo animals, and aquaculture animals. Unlike most continental U.S. institutions, the emphasis of the present program is on tropical production systems with particular reference to the Pacific Basin or other subtropical regions. Animal scientists have careers in management and production, veterinary medicine, food processing and marketing, animal biotechnology, zoo and wildlife management, the pharmaceutical and feed and aquaculture industries, teaching, extension education, and research. Those positions require skills in disciplines such as nutrition, genetics, physiology, environmental and waste management, meat science and growth biology, animal health, feed and forage/browse utilization, engineering, business management/marketing, and salesmanship. Other skills of critical importance are computer proficiency, written and oral communication, problem solving, and ability to build effective interpersonal relationships.

The undergraduate curricula in food science and human nutrition (FSHN) have a strong science base that is applied to food and human nutrition. Options in the curricula include dietetics, human nutrition, and science education. Interest in nutrition, food, and the relationship of food to human health and fitness has never been greater than today. Students majoring in any of the curriculum options are prepared for diverse careers in the food industry, health-care and fitness facilities, hospitals, nutrition education and communication enterprises, government or private-sector food and nutrition agencies, science related research laboratories, and science education. Students learn problem-solving skills, approaches to critical thinking and basic principles in two related disciplines. The dietetic option has been approved by the American Dietetic Association. The human nutrition option can be directed toward nutrition education, sports nutrition, or other interests. The human nutrition option can serve as a pre-professional program in medicine, dentistry, nutrition, or other scientific graduate programs. The science education option provides students with a curriculum that fulfills the academic requirements for a chemistry, biology, or general science certification as a secondary school science teacher. To complete certification requirements, a student can apply for the College of Education Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in the Secondary Education Program.

Students are strongly encouraged to take required chemistry and biological sciences courses prior to entering the program. Students who want to transfer into the food science and human nutrition (FSHN) program are required to have a minimum GPA of 3.0 and to have completed FSHN 185 with a grade of B (not B-) or better and to have completed the following courses with a grade of C (not C-) or better: MATH 140, PHYL 141/141L, PHYL 142/142L, CHEM 161/161L, and CHEM 162/162L.

Upon entering either program, animal sciences (ANSC) or food science and human nutrition (FSHN), students will be assisted by academic advisors to identify their career objectives and select an appropriate option for study.

Advising

All FSHN and ANSC majors are required to report for advising prior to registration each semester.

Undergraduate Study

BS in Animal Sciences/Pre-Veterinary Medicine

Degree Requirements

  • Course work in the basic sciences, mathematics, economics, and animal sciences including the following:
    • MATH 140 or above
    • PHYS 151/151L
    • CHEM 161/161L, 162/162L, and 272/272L
    • NREM 220 or ECON 131
    • MBBE 402/402L
    • One of BIOL 171, MICR 130, or ZOOL 101
  • Animal sciences required courses:
    • ANSC 200, 201, 244, 301, 321, and 445
    • Four of the following: ANSC 446, 451, 453, 454/454L, 462, and 472
    • One of the following production courses: ANSC 431, 432, 433, and 450
  • Additional electives to make a total of 120 credit hours

In order to enroll in animal science courses, all prerequisite courses must be passed with a grade of C (not C-) or higher.

Because of the diversity among fields of specialization within animal sciences, specific course requirements will vary considerably among students. On the recommendation of the student's major advisor, courses will be selected from those offered in animal sciences, as well as in natural resources and environmental management, bioengineering, anatomy and reproductive biology, biochemistry and biophysics, chemistry, environmental biochemistry, food science and human nutrition, genetics, tropical plant and soil sciences, information and computer sciences, microbiology, oceanography, physiology, and zoology.

For information on a Bachelor Degree Program Sheet, go to www.manoa.hawaii.edu/ovcaa/programsheets/.

Veterinary Science

Students interested in becoming veterinarians generally major in animal sciences within the Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences, and participate in CTAHR's Pre-Veterinary Medicine Program. A BS degree in a science-related field is desirable but not required for veterinary schools. The CTAHR Pre-Veterinary Program advisor assists students in meeting the admission requirements of veterinary schools, including academic requirements and veterinary/animal experience requirements. The Pre-Veterinary Medicine Program offers opportunities to gain experience through mentorship with local veterinarians and those in the various animal industries of Hawai'i. The department also sponsors the Pre-Veterinary Medicine Club of Hawai'i, which offers students opportunities to interact with other students interested in veterinary medicine as well as participate in hands-on activities and other club events. Hawai'i residents are eligible to apply for participation in the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) program that includes agreements with Colorado State University, Washington State University, and Oregon State University to preferentially accept students from the Western Region as a subset of each entering veterinary class. Hawai'i students are also encouraged to make applications to other continental U.S. veterinary schools that accept nonresident students. Students should contact the website of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges for information about the Veterinary Medical College Application Service at www.aavmc.org/ and for more information about specific requirements for admission to veterinary schools. Students seeking additional information and advising should contact the Pre-Veterinary Medicine Program prevetprogram@ctahr.hawaii.edu or the Department of Human Nutrition, Food, and Animal Sciences, Agricultural Sciences Building, 1955 East-West Road, Room 216, Honolulu, HI 96822 (808) 956-7095.

BS in Food Science and Human Nutrition

Admissions

Incoming freshmen are admitted directly to the major. Transfer student from other majors and transfer students from other institutions with interest in the Food Science and Human Nutrition (FSHN) major must meet admission criteria prior to being accepted into the FSHN major. A student will be accepted into Human Nutrition Options within the FSHN major when the following criteria are met: minimum 2.8 GPA; CHEM 161/161L and 162/162L, PHYL 141/141L and 142/142L, and pre-calculus or higher calculus completed with a C grade or better, and FSHN 185 completed with a B grade or better. A student will be accepted into Food Science Options within the FSHN major when the following criteria are met: minimum 2.5 GPA; FSHN 185 with B grade or better and CHEM 161/161L, 162/162L, and MATH 140 (or higher math) with C grade or better. Students interested in the Food Science option may be admitted directly into FSHN; please contact the undergraduate advising coordinator (Maria Stewart, PhD; mstew@hawaii.edu, (808) 956-9114 for more information.

Degree Requirements–All Human Nutrition Options

Course work in the basic sciences and mathematics for all human nutrition options include the following: MATH 140 or above, CHEM 161/161L, 162/162L, 272, PHYL 141/141L, 142/142L, MBBE 375 or 402, BIOL 171/171L, NREM 310.

Course work within the major include the following: FSHN 181/181L, 185, 370, 389, 485, 486, 492. To fulfill degree requirements, students must also complete the coursework designated in one of the options listed below.

Contact the Human Nutrition, Food, and Animal Science Department for current degree requirements, Ag Sci 216, 1955 East-West Road, (808) 956-7095.

Human Nutrition Dietetics Option

Students choosing a professional career as a registered dietitian (RD) and who desire to do nutrition counseling should select the academic course work outlined in this option. The Didactic Program in Dietetics at UH Manoa is currently granted accreditation by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND), 120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606-6995, (800) 877-1600 ext. 5400. Upon receiving a bachelor of science degree, students must be accepted into an accredited internship or an approved pre-professional practice program. Upon successful completion of a 6 to 11 month internship, or Preprofessional Practice Program, the student is eligible to take the national dietetic registration examination administered by the Commission on Dietetic Registration. Students generally need to have a GPA of 3.2 or above to be competitive for internship programs. Students may contact Dr. Anne Shovic ((808) 956-3847, email: shovic@hawaii.edu), the Dietetics Program Director, and are encouraged to refer to the Dietetics Option Student Handbook for more information about this option (http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/hnfas/degrees/undergrad/DSH2012.pdf). Work and/or volunteer experience in the field of interest is highly recommended. Courses required for the Dietetics Option include BIOL 340 or CMB 411, PHRM 203, SOC 100, PSY 100, FSHN 311, 312, 322, 381, 440, 451, 452, 467, 468, 469, 480, and 488.

For information on a Bachelor Degree Program Sheet, go to www.manoa.hawaii.edu/ovcaa/programsheets/.

Human Nutrition Pre-professional Option

This course of study allows students to prepare for post-baccalaureate study in nutrition and nutrition-related disciplines. With guidance from their advisor, students can design a course of study to prepare them for post-baccalaureate studies in health professional programs (medicine, dental, pharmacy, etc.), or a graduate degree program in nutrition or other biomedical science. This course of study does not meet all of the undergraduate academic requirements of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics to apply for a dietetic internship. Students in the Pre-professional option must take the following: a minimum of 9 credits selected from the following FSHN courses: 244, 381, 451, 452, 467, 468, 469, 480; and MICR 130/140 or FSHN 440; and MBBE 402L; and a course in genetics or molecular biology; and 17 credits of math, science, and/or health-related electives selected with advisor approval.

For information on a Bachelor Degree Program Sheet, go to www.manoa.hawaii.edu/ovcaa/programsheets/.

Human Nutrition Sports and Wellness Option

Students who are interested in pursuing a career in sports and wellness, are encouraged to complete course work in Applied Musculo-skeletal Anatomy, Exercise Physiology (KRS 353, 354, and 354L), and Nutrition in Exercise and Sport (FSHN 480). These recommended courses can be added to the dietetics program option if the student desires to do professional nutritional counseling or be taken as electives in the human nutrition option if the student intends to pursue graduate studies. Students in the Sports and Wellness option must take the following: a minimum of 9 credits selected from the following FSHN courses: 244, 381, 451, 452, 467, 468, 469; and MICR 130/140 or FSHN 440; and KRS 353, 354/354L, FSHN 480, and 8 credits of health-related electives selected with advisor approval.

For information on a Bachelor Degree Program Sheet, go to www.manoa.hawaii.edu/ovcaa/programsheets/.

Degree Requirements–Food Science Option

This study track educates and develops skills in students who desire to work in food processing, regulation, and food business arena, both in the public and private sector. This track also prepares students for managerial positions since there is a high demand for people with skills in food science and knowledge of business, accounting, and interpersonal skills. Students learn about food chemistry, microbiology, structure, engineering, safety, regulation, sanitation, quality control, and business-oriented courses.

Course work in the basic sciences and mathematics for all food science options include the following: MATH 140 or above, CHEM 161/161L, 162/162L, 272, PHYL 151, MICR 130, 140L, MBBE 375 or 402, BIOL 171/171L, NREM 310.

Students in the Food Science option must take the following FSHN courses: FSHN 181/181L, 185, 381, 403, 411, 430/430L, 440, 445, 460, 477/477L, 494. All FSHN majors selecting the Food Science Option must select one of the following specialties to complete degree requirements:

  • Business: ACC 201, BUS 312, 315, ECON 130, IS 250
  • Pre-professional: CHEM 272L/273, MATH 215, 216, PHYS 152.
For information on a Bachelor Degree Program Sheet, go to www.manoa.hawaii.edu/ovcaa/programsheets/.

Requirements

A total of at least 120 credits are required for graduation. Students seeking additional information and advising should contact the Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences, Agricultural Sciences Building, 1955 East-West Road, Room 216, Honolulu, HI 96822; (808) 956-7095, email: hnfas@ctahr.hawaii.edu.

Graduate Study

The department offers graduate programs leading to MS and PhD degrees. Students can choose from three MS degree options: animal sciences, nutritional sciences, or food science. The department is also the home locus for the inter-college PhD program in nutrition. Admission and degree requirements for each program are listed below, but are subject to change. For current information, contact the Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences, Agricultural Sciences Building, 1955 East-West Road, Room 216, Honolulu, HI 96822; (808) 956-7095, email: hnfas@ctahr.hawaii.edu.

MS in Animal Sciences

The MS in animal sciences is offered in both the basic and applied areas of genetics, nutrition, physiology, reproduction, animal health, molecular biology of growth and metabolism, and animal muscle biology.

Specialty areas consist of beef-cattle nutrition, grazing management, and genetics; dairy-cattle nutrition and physiology (especially the management of cattle in a hot climate); swine management; reproductive physiology and endocrinology of sheep, cattle, fish and swine; molecular biology of animal growth and metabolism; muscle biology and meat science; reproduction, animal health; nutrient/waste management; and freshwater and saltwater shrimp breeding and production, nutrition, and pond management systems. Emphasis is placed on the application of scientific methods for both the development and improvement of animal industries in subtropical and tropical environments. There is also the opportunity for cooperative studies in the areas of care/welfare and management of pets and companion animals (including horses), marine mammals, exotic wildlife, and/or zoo animals. Candidates wishing to specialize in animal breeding and genetics should be particularly strong in mathematics, including statistics, with a good biological background.

Admission Requirements

To be considered for admission to the animal sciences program, an applicant must: (1) hold a bachelor's degree with a major in animal science (or the equivalent thereof) from an accredited institution of higher learning with a GPA of 3.0 or higher, (2) provide evidence of superior scholarship in previous academic work, (3) arrange for three letters of recommendation, (4) submit GRE general test scores, (5) submit an application including a statement of objectives, (6) submit a resume, and (7) submit a TOEFL score of 580 minimum, 600 recommended (250 computer) if a foreign student. Interviews by phone or in person in Hawai'i may be requested by the admissions committee. An applicant with a bachelor's degree in a major other than animal or veterinary sciences who otherwise qualifies for admission will be required to take ANSC 200 or 201, one production course, and such other undergraduate courses deemed necessary by the department as essential background to the applicant's studies. The ANSC 200 or 201 requirements may be satisfied through meeting the teaching experience requirement.

The deadlines for receipt of all application materials are February 1 for fall applicants, and September 1 for spring semester applicants.

Degree Requirements

Plan A (Thesis)

Students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours, including:

  • At least 18 credits of course work at the graduate level, 12 of which must be at the 600 level or above (excluding 699 and 700) including two credits of ANSC 641 (Seminar in Animal Sciences) and FSHN 601;
  • a maximum of 2 credits of Directed Research (ANSC 699); and
  • 10 credits of Thesis Research (ANSC 700).

Plan B (Non-thesis)

Students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours, including:

  • At least 18 credits in course work numbered 600 and above (excluding 699), including two credits of ANSC 641 and FSHN 601.
  • 6-9 credits of Directed Research (ANSC 699).
  • Remaining credits must be at the graduate level.

Both Plan A and B

A general exam on basic knowledge in the animal sciences is required of all students to advance to candidacy for the MS degree. A final exam based on the student's Plan A Thesis Research or Plan B Directed Research is also required. Students are required to attend weekly seminars each semester and present a minimum of three formal seminars during their graduate training (including their thesis defense). A maximum of 2 credits is allowed for graduate seminar (ANSC 641). The following courses are recommended as a core for most graduate students in animal sciences: ANSC 642, 643, 644, 650, 652, 657, 687, and a graduate-level statistics course.

Each student will be required to serve as a teaching assistant (TA), in either a paid or non-paid status, for a minimum of one course for one semester. This experience must include leading laboratory or discussion sections, and evaluation by the instructor.

In both plans (on the recommendation of the student's graduate committee), the graduate credit hours will be selected from the graduate courses offered in animal sciences or other related disciplines such as anatomy and reproductive biology, biochemistry, chemistry, genetics, microbiology, physiology, public health, zoology. Because of the diversity of specializations within animal sciences, specific course requirements will vary considerably among students. Further information is available at www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/hnfas/degrees/grad/ANSC.html.

MS in Nutritional Sciences

The MS in nutritional sciences prepares students to understand the scientific basis of nutrition, its application to health and fitness, and the skills needed to conduct basic and applied nutrition research. Subject areas of concentration include clinical nutrition, obesity, dietary fiber, functional fiber and bioactive food components, diet and cancer, mineral nutrition and toxicology, sports nutrition, nutrition education, nutritional product development, community and international nutrition, nutritional biochemistry, and nutritional epidemiology. The program does not include an RD internship. Cooperating programs include public health, kinesiology and rehabilitation science, food science, animal sciences, physiology, John A. Burns School of Medicine, and the University of Hawai'i Cancer Center.

Depending on the area of focus, students are prepared for diverse careers in nutrition and food-related industries, government agencies, and academic institutions. Graduates have found employment as college instructors; nutrition educators or consultants in the private sector; nutritionists in the food industry, fitness facilities, or health-related government agencies; and as research scientists in the health-care industry, private sector, government, or academic research institutions. Many have pursued PhD or other professional degrees at major universities around the country.

Admission Requirements

Academic prerequisites include a bachelor's degree in nutrition or a closely related field, a minimum grade point average of 3.0, and undergraduate course work in nutrition, physiology, biochemistry, and statistics. Motivated students without a nutrition related degree may apply, but will be expected to make up undergraduate course deficiencies if admitted into the program. Students are strongly encouraged to take introductory science courses prior to applying to the program including at least two of the above mentioned prerequisites (one preferably being introductory nutrition). Additional requirements include submission of GRE General Test scores (no minimum score required), two confidential recommendations (using our program's recommendation forms), a TOEFL score of 580 minimum, 600 recommended (250 computer, 100 internet) if a foreign student; a personal resume; and a completed Graduate Admissions Application including statement of objectives. Interviews by phone (or in person if in Hawai'i) may be requested by the admissions committee. The deadlines for receipt of all application materials are February 1 for fall semester applicants, and September 1 for spring semester applicants.

Further information is available at www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/hnfas/degrees/grad/NUTRms.html.

Degree Requirements

Two MS degree options are available: Plan A (thesis) and Plan B (non-thesis). Generally, students are expected to follow Plan A unless the Plan B option is approved by the graduate chairperson and the student's advisor.

Plan A (Thesis)

Students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours, including:

  • 18 credit hours of coursework at the graduate level, 12 of which must be at the 600 level (excluding 699 and 700);
  • 2 credits of Directed Research (699); and
  • 10 credits of Thesis Research (700).

Plan B (Non-thesis)

Students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours, including:

  • At least 18 credit hours of coursework at the 600 level or above (excluding 699) and
  • 6-9 credits of Directed Research (699); and
  • Remaining credits are fulfilled by graduate level electives that are selected in consultation with the graduate advisor.

Both Plan A and B

All students are required to pass an oral exam of basic nutrition knowledge to advance to candidacy for the MS degree, and pass a final exam/oral defense of their Thesis Research (Plan A) or Directed Reading and Research (Plan B). The following courses are required as a core for most graduate students in nutritional sciences: FSHN 601, 681, 685, 689, a graduate-level statistics course, and at least one of the following: FSHN 668, 682, 784, or 785. FSHN 681 Seminar in Food and Nutritional Sciences, must be taken at least four times, including at least twice for a letter grade (A-F). Each student will be required to serve as a teaching assistant (TA), in either a paid or non-paid status, for a minimum of one semester. This experience must include a significant instructional component and evaluation by the instructor.

In both plans (in consultation with the student's graduate committee), the graduate credit hours will be selected from the graduate courses offered in nutritional sciences as well as other related disciplines such as food science, cell and molecular biology, epidemiology, genetics, physiology, public health, kinesiology, and statistics. Because of the diversity of specializations within nutritional sciences, specific course requirements will vary among students. Please see our website at www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/hnfas/degrees/grad/NUTRms.html.

MS in Food Science

The MS in food science offers areas of concentration in food safety and quality, food processing and engineering, food chemistry and biochemistry, food microbiology, product development, and food science education. Graduates have found employment as college instructors, technical personnel in the food industry, regulatory or other governmental agencies, and researchers. Others have pursued further postgraduate studies.

Admission requirements

Academic prerequisites include a bachelor's degree in food science or a closely related field, a minimum grade point average of 3.0, and undergraduate course work in introductory foods, biochemistry, introductory nutrition, and statistics. Motivated students without a food science-related degree may apply, but will be expected to make up undergraduate deficiencies if admitted. Students are strongly encouraged to take chemistry and introductory food courses prior to applying to the program.

Additional requirements include: submission of GRE General Test scores (no minimum score required); two confidential recommendations (using our program's recommendation forms); a TOEFL score of 580 minimum, 600 recommended (250 computer) if a foreign student; a personal resume; and a completed Graduate Admissions Application including statement of objectives. Interviews by phone or in person if in Hawai'i may be requested by the admissions committee. The deadlines for receipt of all application materials are February 1 for fall semester applicants, and September 1 for spring semester applicants.

Degree Requirements

Plan A (Thesis)

Students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours, including:

  • At least 18 credit hours of course work, 12 of which must be at the 600 level or above (excluding 699 and 700)
  • 2 credits of Directed Research (699); and
  • 10 credits of Thesis Research (700)

Plan B (Non-thesis)

Students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours, including:

  • At least 18 credit hours of course work at the 600 level or above (excluding 699); and
  • 6 to 9 credits of Directed Research (699); and
  • Remaining credits are fulfilled by graduate level electives that are selected in consultation with the graduate advisor.

Both Plan A and B

All students are required to pass an oral exam of basic knowledge in food science to advance to candidacy for the MS degree, and a final exam/oral defense of their Thesis Research (Plan A) or Directed Research (Plan B). Students are required to register for Seminar in Food and Nutritional Sciences (FSHN 681) during four semesters, and present a minimum two seminars for a letter grade (A-F) during their graduate program. The following courses are required as a core for graduate students in food science: FSHN 601, 607, 608, 681, 701, and a graduate-level statistics course. Each student will be required to serve as a teaching assistant (TA), in either a paid or non-paid status, for a minimum of one course for one semester. This experience must include a significant instructional component and evaluation by the instructor.

In both plans (in consultation with the student's graduate committee), the graduate credit hours will be selected from graduate courses offered in food science as well as other related disciplines such as biochemistry, nutrition, microbiology, genetics, biotechnology, cell and molecular biology, and statistics. Because of the diversity of specializations within food science, specific course requirements will vary among students. Further information is available at www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/hnfas/degrees/grad/FSHN.html.

PhD in Nutrition

In today's world, the relationship between diet and health is of great interest among consumers, medical professionals, research scientists, government policy makers, and private industries related to food, agriculture, and healthcare. To serve these clients and improve human health, especially in Hawai'i and the Asia-Pacific region, the PhD program in nutrition is designed to prepare future leaders and innovators who can expand our knowledge about food and health, solve nutrition-related problems, propose effective nutrition policies, guide new product and service development, and be ethical and effective researchers, communicators, and educators. To ensure that graduates are prepared for these roles, students will be expected to demonstrate:

  1. Comprehensive understanding of core nutrition knowledge;
  2. Advanced scholarship in a specialty area (i.e., expertise in a least one overlapping biomedical discipline e.g., biochemistry, physiology, cell and molecular biology, food science/functional foods, epidemiology, biostatistics, medicine, etc.);
  3. Appropriate exposure to social and career-building disciplines (e.g., education, communications, information technology, technical writing, social sciences, etc.);
  4. Ability to conduct original scholarly research, develop skills in research methodologies and grant writing, understand research ethics, and effectively dissemination research findings via peer-reviewed publications, seminars, and practical applications such as teaching.

To accomplish these goals, the PhD program integrates faculty and resources from the instructional and research programs housed in the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR), John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM), and University of Hawai'i Cancer Center to create an inter-college PhD program that will produce highly marketable, interdisciplinary graduates that can assume leadership roles in the field of nutrition.

Admission Requirements

The admission process is considered a critical step in insuring the success and quality of the program and its graduates; therefore, applicants will be carefully evaluated and selected. The admissions committee is chosen and led by the graduate chair and is made up of graduate faculty with proven records in mentoring successful graduate students. To insure consistent quality of training and financial support, the number of applicants admitted will be kept in line with the availability of high-quality dissertation advisors and available support. Students will not be admitted without a plan to support them and evidence of a faculty member's willingness to serve as a dissertation advisor.

Applicants should have a BS or MS degree in nutrition or a closely related biological science; however, highly motivated students with other degrees may be considered if they have excellent academic backgrounds and demonstrated strength in the biological sciences. Applicants are expected to demonstrate adequate preparation in nutrition, biochemistry, physiology, and statistics. If admitted without sufficient preparation in theses areas, these prerequisites must be made up early in the student's program. The admissions committee will determine course deficiencies in an applicant's background.

Additional admission requirements include a minimum grade point average of 3.4 out of 4.0 for applicants with a BS, and 3.6 out of 4.0 for applicants with a MS or other advanced degree; submission of GRE general test scores that demonstrate performance above the 50% percentile in all areas; three letters of recommendation from individuals that can comment on academic and research potential, a personal resume, and a completed Graduate Admissions Application including a personal statement of objectives that includes reasons for wanting to attend graduate school, research interests, and career goals. Foreign applicants must obtain a minimum TOEFL score of 600 (paper), 250 (computer), or 100 (internet). Interviews (in person or by phone) are required of all applicants deemed admissible by the admissions committee. In selecting applicants for admission, particular attention will be paid to the quality and depth of the personal statement, the strength of the letters of recommendation (i.e., they must indicate exceptional potential), and the professional qualities and academic depth presented in the personal interview.

The deadline for receipt of all application materials are February 1 for fall and September 1 for spring applicants. The resume and personal statement of applicants should be sent electronically to the graduate chair PhD in Nutrition at hnfas@ctahr.hawaii.edu.

Further information is available at www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/hnfas/degrees/grad/NUTRphd.html.

Degree Requirements

The principal requirements for the PhD degree are:

  1. Pass a qualifying examination for admission to candidacy,
  2. Complete required coursework,
  3. Pass a comprehensive exam to demonstrate advanced scholarship in the field, and
  4. Defend a doctoral dissertation that presents original, independent research.

In addition, all PhD candidates are required to participate in a substantial teaching project with a graduate faculty mentor during at least one semester of their program (if entering with a BS, two semesters are required).

Qualifying exam. The purpose of the qualifying exam is to evaluate the student's basic knowledge in nutrition-related fields, determine if the student has a strong enough background to proceed successfully with their doctoral program, and enable advisors to assist the student in planning an appropriate program of study. The areas covered by the exam include basic nutrition, biochemistry, physiology, statistics, epidemiology, and experimental design. The exam may be oral and/or written as decided by the examining committee. The committee will consist of at least three members of the graduate faculty chosen by the student in consultation with their advisor, and must be approved by the graduate chair. The exam is repeatable once after successful petition to the graduate chair. Students failing the exam twice must withdraw from the program. Students entering the program with a BS degree will be required to pass the qualifying exam within the first two years of their program. Candidates entering with a MS or other advanced degree must pass the exam within one year. Extensions can be made for students with course deficiencies to make up. Students entering from the nutritional sciences MS program at UH Manoa within five years of receiving their MS degree are exempt from the exam, as suitability for the PhD program will be assessed during their MS program via the candidacy exam and thesis defense/final exam.

Dissertation proposal defense. Students entering with a BS degree are required to defend their dissertation research proposal to the satisfaction of their dissertation advisor. They must do this after they pass their qualifying exam and after they have met all other requirements for the Plan A master's degree in nutritional sciences except the completion of a formal thesis. The proposal should consist of a written and oral presentation of the proposed dissertation research. This proposal defense serves as a capstone, similar to a MS thesis defense, and assures that the student can demonstrate sufficient research skills and knowledge of the research plan to proceed with the dissertation research. The dissertation committee will consist of the student's advisor and at least four members of the graduate faculty chosen by the student in consultation with their advisor, and must be approved by the graduate chair. The student must pass the proposal defense to be eligible for the comprehensive exam. The defense is repeatable once after successful petition to the graduate chair.

Required course work. PhD students are required to have at least 18 credits of graduate level course work (excluding research credits) beyond their MS degree. If entering with a BS degree, at least 36 credits of graduate level course work (excluding research credits) beyond the BS are required. These course requirements are described below.

Students entering with a BS degree are required to meet all requirements for the Plan A master's degree in nutritional sciences, excluding the production of a formal written thesis. The course requirements include any course deficiencies recommended by the admissions committee plus the following 18 credits of graduate level coursework:

  • 11 credits of required nutrition courses [FSHN 601, 685, 689 and at least one of the following: FSHN 668, 682, 784, or 785], including 2 credits of FSHN 681
  • 3 credits in statistics at the graduate level (e.g. PH 655)
  • 4 credits of advisor-approved electives

In addition, at least 12 credits of 699 are required.

Students entering with a MS or other advanced degree are required to make up any course deficiencies in their background prior to taking the qualifying exam. Course deficiencies will be assessed by the admissions committee. Credits obtained by making up course deficiencies cannot be used to meet the 18 credit course requirements for the PhD.

After the above requirements are met by students entering with a BS or MS, all continuing PhD students must take a minimum of 18 credits of course work (excluding research credits) consisting of at least:

  • 6 credits of graduate nutrition courses including 2 credits of FSHN 681
  • 6 credits in graduate level courses that will foster development of a specialty area in a field overlapping with the discipline of nutrition. For example: biochemistry, cell and molecular biology, epidemiology, medicine, biostatistics, functional foods/food science.
  • 6 credits in graduate level courses from career-building disciplines such as communications, education, information technology, technical writing, or social sciences.

The student in consultation with his or her dissertation advisor will decide on the specific courses used to meet the above 18-credit requirement. An example of a model course of study for a student entering with a BS in nutrition, and examples of available specialty area courses and career-building courses are available on our program website at: www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/hnfas/degrees/grad/NUTRPhd.html.

Required teaching experience. To foster teaching skills, all PhD candidates must participate in a substantial teaching project during at least one semester of their program. All students who are not paid teaching assistants are required to develop, with an instructor of their choice, an instructional experience equivalent to a quarter time teaching assistantship (10 hours per week) that includes in-class lectures/instructional activities, or laboratory instruction. At the conclusion of the experience, their instructional mentor must submit a written evaluation of their performance to the graduate chair. Unsatisfactory evaluations will result in the need to repeat the experience until a favorable evaluation is achieved. Students entering with a BS must additionally fulfill the instructional experience required as part of the MS in nutritional sciences (6 hours per week for one semester) prior to sitting for their dissertation proposal defense.

Comprehensive exam. When candidates have completed all, or most of their course work toward the PhD, they must pass a comprehensive exam to verify that they can function as a professional in the field. The timing of the exam will be decided upon by the student in consultation with their advisor. The purpose of this exam is to determine the student's comprehension of fundamental nutrition knowledge, expertise in an overlapping discipline, and competence in research, communications, and critical thinking skills. The form of the exam is both written and oral. It will be conducted by an examination committee composed of at least three members of the graduate faculty (excluding the student's advisor) with collective expertise to cover the range of expectations listed above. The composition of the committee is proposed by the student in consultation with their advisor. To insure the quality and consistency of exam committees, its composition must be approved by the graduate chair. The time frame and grading of the exam will be decided by the committee. The examination criteria and procedures will conform to the Graduate Division's standards for all Manoa doctorate programs. A student must pass this exam to achieve candidacy and remain in the PhD program. The exam is repeatable once after successful petition to the graduate chair. After passing the exam the student is eligible to formally select their doctoral committee as described below.

Dissertation

All PhD candidates must conduct scholarly, independent, original research that contributes new knowledge to the field. The candidates develop and conduct research projects under the direction of their dissertation advisor and doctoral committee. The doctoral committee is selected by the student in consultation with their dissertation advisor, and must be approved by the graduate chair. The dissertation advisor (chair of the doctoral committee), and a majority of the committee members must come from the nutrition graduate faculty. The committee must have at least 5 members, with one member being from a graduate faculty outside the student's field of study and area of specialization. At the conclusion of the research process, students write a dissertation, i.e. a scholarly presentation of their research in publication form. The student's doctoral committee then conducts a final examination to assess the student's ability to orally present their dissertation in a seminar format, and defend their research and written dissertation. The final exam is repeatable once after successful petition to the graduate dean. The dissertation, final exam criteria and procedures will conform to the Graduate Division's standards for all UH Manoa doctorate programs. Further information is available at: www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/hnfas/degrees/grad/NUTRPhd.html.

Honors and Awards

The department has several teaching assistantships, research assistantships, and scholarships that are awarded to deserving qualified students.

FSHN Courses